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Struggling with vegetarianism
09-04-2017, 02:06 PM
Post: #1
Struggling with vegetarianism
I love animals, probably more than most humans. And the older I get the harder it is for me to eat meat. I'm struggling with it and I think I'm going to stop eating meat. Others can do whatever they want and I'm not going to be a militant nazi left wing lunatic about others who do eat meat. I just want to stop. Not that I care but most of the world looks down on the group and even within this group we have vegans who look down on regular vegetarians. So it won't be easy to tolerate these people but I suppose that's the price I/we pay.

The other problem I have is I am a picky eater and there are some fruits and veggies I cannot eat due to allergy/intolerance/kidney stone risk/etc. I'm well versed with nutrition so I'm not worried but it will be a lot of work, which I don't have a lot of time for. Haha. I've already given up alcohol so I could do this.

Anyone else a vegetarian?

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09-04-2017, 04:14 PM
Post: #2
RE: Struggling with vegetarianism
(09-04-2017 02:06 PM)JCE3000GT Wrote:  I love animals, probably more than most humans. And the older I get the harder it is for me to eat meat. I'm struggling with it and I think I'm going to stop eating meat. Others can do whatever they want and I'm not going to be a militant nazi left wing lunatic about others who do eat meat. I just want to stop. Not that I care but most of the world looks down on the group and even within this group we have vegans who look down on regular vegetarians. So it won't be easy to tolerate these people but I suppose that's the price I/we pay.

The other problem I have is I am a picky eater and there are some fruits and veggies I cannot eat due to allergy/intolerance/kidney stone risk/etc. I'm well versed with nutrition so I'm not worried but it will be a lot of work, which I don't have a lot of time for. Haha. I've already given up alcohol so I could do this.

Anyone else a vegetarian?

I've never been a Vegetarian; but I did stop eating pork, shrimp, crab, lobster and most forms of sea life for about 10 years. I did continue to eat Chicken, Beef, and the occasional lamb--you know, all the kosher meats due to my spirituality. I have returned to my original diet from childhood, since the training was finished at this point. I have moved on to other life training, such as going beyond being a good person, focusing on the big picture (worldwide and Universe instead of my tiny speck of a life), re-adjust my attention to others at 100% instead of self, and so on.

It wasn't too difficult. There were some cravings, but nothing I couldn't handle. The big problem was at the dinner table or eating out, people look at me funny and asked a bunch of questions. I was always sticking out like a sore thumb, kind of an exile from society just because I ate differently. If people cooked for me, they had a hard time adjusting their recipes to accommodate my eating restrictions. I won't name anybody, but they did ridicule me by joking around just because I had a different diet.

Anyway, I understand your love for animals. And it is certainly admirable and surely loving to stop eating them due to potential cruelty of slaughter and so forth (trying not to be graphic here). If you study spirituality, metaphysics, and reality mastery as much I do, you would also know that animals are our little brothers and sisters with a potential to evolve to their next level of existence (2nd Density to 3rd Density). Humans are 3rd Level Density in our evolution. Animals evolve mostly through their interactions with humans; our own love projected to them. That's why having pets can be very productive in our own life journey. We learn how to love pets, and in turn, we help them evolve through our love.

Now there is another way animals can serve us through love. That is their sacrifice for humans as food. It is not wrong to eat animals if they served us through that manner, provided they were killed in a humane way (similar to the Jews and other religious sects). That's why it is important to buy 100% kosher meat from Jewish Organizations inspected by Rabbis if you're going to eat meat.

But it is wrong by going out and hunting wild animals for game. Yes, people do use them for food afterwards. But it is not their primary intention. Hunting is not a sacrifice but a form of animalistic pleasure for humans. It is selfish and does not honor the animal.

Finally, I would like to mention the human body. Our 3rd Density bodies mostly use energy from food. And a lot of it comes from animals. Unless you are a well-trained adept and don't require much energy from food, you are going to need vegetables, fruits, grains & rice, and lastly meat. I don't eat very much food at all. I eat twice a day but small meals. I get most of my energy from Ether (5th Element). I use it to function daily, to heal, and to help others. People who do eventually graduate to 4th Density Level (some folks on Earth has already done this), they don't require food at all. Their bodies are full of energy all the time, never get sick, and don't age.

Becoming a Vegetarian is a good idea. It does allow you to overcome some of your body cravings, and you will become more disciplined. But living in this society, you will have many challenges I can assure you, both from people and yourself. Try it for a while to see how it goes, then go from there. There are other factors that involve your decision to become a Vegetarian as well. But it is too complex to go into detail here.
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09-05-2017, 02:10 AM (This post was last modified: 09-05-2017 02:11 AM by MysticLord.)
Post: #3
RE: Struggling with vegetarianism
(09-04-2017 02:06 PM)JCE3000GT Wrote:  I love animals, probably more than most humans. And the older I get the harder it is for me to eat meat. I'm struggling with it and I think I'm going to stop eating meat. Others can do whatever they want and I'm not going to be a militant nazi left wing lunatic about others who do eat meat. I just want to stop. Not that I care but most of the world looks down on the group and even within this group we have vegans who look down on regular vegetarians. So it won't be easy to tolerate these people but I suppose that's the price I/we pay.

The other problem I have is I am a picky eater and there are some fruits and veggies I cannot eat due to allergy/intolerance/kidney stone risk/etc. I'm well versed with nutrition so I'm not worried but it will be a lot of work, which I don't have a lot of time for. Haha. I've already given up alcohol so I could do this.

Anyone else a vegetarian?

Vegetarianism is an issue mostly because it's much harder to get a high protein diet without meat. A lot of plant-based protein sources contain a lot of phytoestrogens, though to be fair if you eat junk food anyways it won't be a big difference. Having a lot of body fat and eating processed food is about the same, hormone-wise.

The best thing you can do is learn to cook your own food from basic ingredients. I use milk, butter, and eggs in almost all recipes, so it's impossible for me to go vegan and besides that my ancestors didn't conquer the world so I can spare the lives of a few chickens. There are substitutes for these things, but they're more expensive and don't work as well. If you're cooking everything from scratch the price works out.

I heard cocoa butter can work as a butter substitute for baking, but don't quote me on it. It's very expensive and it lasts years.

Look at wheat bran, wheat germ, and powdered oats (literally, put oats in a blender) to increase the protein/fat/fiber contents of baked goods while reducing the sugar and starch. If you live near a waremart or winco, pick up unsalted baked peanuts and maybe walnuts if they're cheap - they are great in cookies and cakes. For non-sweet breads you can add powdered beans and peas (especially chickpeas), which are exactly what they sound like.

http://www.calbeans.org/homemade-bean-flour/

http://www.livestrong.com/article/372131...uten-free/

Once I get a decent job and my own place I'll invest in a good grinder/food-processor, then buy a buttload of stuff and store powdered goods. A blender can work, but it must work harder and needs more breaks.

Powdered beans and peas add flavor and nutrients to soups and broth.

The only products you should avoid are those that contain soy.

Use olive oil for cooking salty/savory foods, and peanut oil for sweet foods.

Spices are essential, especially those that lack calories. Mustard, lemons, limes, and hot sauce is your friend.

Spend some time on wikipedia looking at beans and vegan cuisine.
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09-05-2017, 02:55 AM
Post: #4
RE: Struggling with vegetarianism
Thanks for the reply all. I'll craft a reply when I'm not on my phone. Grin

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09-08-2017, 02:26 PM
Post: #5
RE: Struggling with vegetarianism
Fix my previous post. Meant to thank both of you all! Sad

(09-05-2017 02:10 AM)MysticLord Wrote:  
(09-04-2017 02:06 PM)JCE3000GT Wrote:  I love animals, probably more than most humans. And the older I get the harder it is for me to eat meat. I'm struggling with it and I think I'm going to stop eating meat. Others can do whatever they want and I'm not going to be a militant nazi left wing lunatic about others who do eat meat. I just want to stop. Not that I care but most of the world looks down on the group and even within this group we have vegans who look down on regular vegetarians. So it won't be easy to tolerate these people but I suppose that's the price I/we pay.

The other problem I have is I am a picky eater and there are some fruits and veggies I cannot eat due to allergy/intolerance/kidney stone risk/etc. I'm well versed with nutrition so I'm not worried but it will be a lot of work, which I don't have a lot of time for. Haha. I've already given up alcohol so I could do this.

Anyone else a vegetarian?

Vegetarianism is an issue mostly because it's much harder to get a high protein diet without meat. A lot of plant-based protein sources contain a lot of phytoestrogens, though to be fair if you eat junk food anyways it won't be a big difference. Having a lot of body fat and eating processed food is about the same, hormone-wise.

The best thing you can do is learn to cook your own food from basic ingredients. I use milk, butter, and eggs in almost all recipes, so it's impossible for me to go vegan and besides that my ancestors didn't conquer the world so I can spare the lives of a few chickens. There are substitutes for these things, but they're more expensive and don't work as well. If you're cooking everything from scratch the price works out.

I heard cocoa butter can work as a butter substitute for baking, but don't quote me on it. It's very expensive and it lasts years.

Look at wheat bran, wheat germ, and powdered oats (literally, put oats in a blender) to increase the protein/fat/fiber contents of baked goods while reducing the sugar and starch. If you live near a waremart or winco, pick up unsalted baked peanuts and maybe walnuts if they're cheap - they are great in cookies and cakes. For non-sweet breads you can add powdered beans and peas (especially chickpeas), which are exactly what they sound like.

http://www.calbeans.org/homemade-bean-flour/

http://www.livestrong.com/article/372131...uten-free/

Once I get a decent job and my own place I'll invest in a good grinder/food-processor, then buy a buttload of stuff and store powdered goods. A blender can work, but it must work harder and needs more breaks.

Powdered beans and peas add flavor and nutrients to soups and broth.

The only products you should avoid are those that contain soy.

Use olive oil for cooking salty/savory foods, and peanut oil for sweet foods.

Spices are essential, especially those that lack calories. Mustard, lemons, limes, and hot sauce is your friend.

Spend some time on wikipedia looking at beans and vegan cuisine.

Thanks again for the post.

The biggest thing for me is the morality of killing an animal and or slaughter houses, especially in this day and age where there are many legitimate protein sources. But as you point out there is no 100% replacement for meat but you can still give the body everything it needs to live healthy assuming you are also active. I'm not being a vegan and swearing off things like cheese and unfertilized eggs and such--just dead animals. So this journey will be easier in that regard. Now if you live off of the land outside of society in the woods then yes you will likely need to eat meat through killing an animal to survive because your access to food is extremely limited, but, things like hunting for sport really gets me angry. Killing something for the fun of it is just not good and frankly I don't believe in the bullshit "population control" argument because lets face it humans are the one trespassing on these animals' homes. We are the ones who need to adapt and not by killing these animals. But I digress since my opinion is so far in the minority. Guess that's my Native American blood speaking out.

The good news is I'm pretty up to speed on food, anatomy, and biology so I know exactly what I can and cannot eat even given my food intolerances and foods that will increase my chances of a kidney stone as well as what nutrients I need. So that part is the easy part. And yes, salsa/hot sauce is your best friend as are spices and such. I used to eat salsa with a spoon! Love that stuff.

And no worries about Soy, not really a fan of the stuff. BANON SMASH!

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09-10-2017, 05:57 PM (This post was last modified: 09-10-2017 10:54 PM by MysticLord.)
Post: #6
RE: Struggling with vegetarianism
From what I understand a lot of food science is bullshit, based on fads, theories, and bad science instead of empirical research (ie, the difference between a chemist and an chemical engineer - one dreams up impractical things, one makes things work). My philosophy is that you should eat what your ancestors ate, because that's what you are evolved to tolerate. I live off dairy products and so does everyone in my family, to zero ill effect; but I can't high carb diets and bizarre ethnic food, especially undercooked seafood.

I imagine most Africans react poorly to high salt diets because they lived as hunter gatherers for thousands of years. The necessary adaptations to food preservation haven't propagated among them yet. Asians and most Africans are lactose intolerant, Asians are used to high-starch/non-saturated-fat diets, native Americans can't process alcohol; it's all natural selection. My ancestors lived in hovels with farm animals and drank weakly alcoholic water to avoid death by diarrhea, so hey thanks for not dying great^10-grandparents.

Quote:Killing something for the fun of it is just not good and frankly I don't believe in the bullshit "population control" argument because lets face it humans are the one trespassing on these animals' homes. We are the ones who need to adapt and not by killing these animals. But I digress since my opinion is so far in the minority. Guess that's my Native American blood speaking out.
Empathy for deer doesn't last long after they destroy your car and eat your garden. If we could have wolves hunt and devour them without harming livestock or ourselves, I'd be all for it. Like a nature documentary in your backyard.





I do agree with you that it's kinda lame to shoot a herbivore with a rifle. Much better to hunt something that can hunt back, and do it with a bow, crossbow, spear, muzzle-loader, or dogs. More of an accomplishment than camping out in a tree with a rifle and splattering bambi's guts over the forest floor between beers.
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